Roger Owens

Sunday, 25 January 2009 16:00 WSO Admin
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Roger Owens

Described as “one of the most formidable talents to emerge from the Royal College of Music in recent years” (Western Mail), Roger Owens has established himself as one of the most versatile of pianists. His repertoire is unusually wide and ranges from Gibbons to Hoddinott, whose music he has premiered on several occasions.

He is well known for his performances of the larger scale solo concertos in the major musical centres of the United Kingdom playing works by Mozart, Beethoven, Grieg, Schumann, Gershwin, Rachmaninov and Tchaikovsky. He has appeared regularly with eminent orchestras including the Royal Scottish National Orchestra and the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra.

Last month he made his Royal Festival Hall debut performing Beethoven’s Choral Fantasy with the Bach Choir and the Philharmonia, and also played Grieg’s Piano Concerto at The Anvil, Basingstoke as well as several recitals on a short tour of Scotland. Forthcoming performances include an appearance at the Freden International Music Festival in Germany as a member of the Eluard Piano Trio.

Roger studied privately with Peter Gould and then at the Royal College of Music with John Barstow MBE, where he was presented with both the Chappell and Tagore Gold Medals. A placement on the Countess of Munster Recital scheme helped to launch his career. He went on to win the Royal Over-Seas League Piano Competition along with the Bryden Thomson recital prize at the Scottish International Piano Competition.

Roger is a skilled communicator whose engaging personality makes him a popular visitor to music societies throughout the British Isles. He has performed as soloist and chamber musician throughout Europe, most recently in Spain and Germany, and has broadcast for BBC Radio 3, Classic FM and German radio. His debut recording of piano works by Liszt (Claudio) was favourably reviewed by International Record Review which singled him out as “gifted” and “clearly a pianist to watch” whose playing “promises much for future issues”.

Last Updated on Thursday, 21 January 2010 22:35